Rollin Kirby

Rollin Kirby


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Rollin Kirby was born in Galva, Illinois, on 4th September, 1875. He studied art in New York and Paris before working as a cartoonist for the New York Evening Mail, New York World and the New York Post. Influenced by the work of Robert Minor and Boardman Robinson, Kirby established himself as America's leading political cartoonist after the First World War.

Kirby won the Pulitzer Prize for cartooning in 1921, 1924 and 1928. Kirby was sympathetic to woman suffrage and contributed cartoons to the Women Voter and the Suffragist. He was also an advocate of civil liberties and the New Deal and attacked political corruption and the Ku Klux Klan.

Rollin Kirby died on 8th May, 1952.


What does the word “cartoon” come from?

The word “cartoon” is derived from either the Italian word cartone or the Dutch word karton, which are both words describing a strong, thick or heavy paper, or pasteboard. These illustrations were originally done on a sturdy piece of paper as a preparatory study or modello for a finished work, such as a painting, tapestry or stained glass. Artists way back then used cartoons to form frescoes, to precisely link the components of the composition when painted on damp plaster over several days, which is referred to as giornate.


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  • Rights Advisory: See Rights and Restrictions Information Page
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-119818 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: LOT 3563-46 [item] [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Albert Edward Sterner

Albert Edward Sterner's "Portrait of Rollin Kirby" is an original drawing created in 1931. This drawing is signed and annotated, "Albert Sterner, of and for his friend" to the lower left. It is a superb, original example of the famous portrait art created by the great American painter, etcher, engraver, lithographer and illustrator, Albert Edward Sterner.

Rollin Kirby (Galva, Illinois, 1875 - New York, 1952) was America's most famous political cartoonist of the 1920's and 1930's. His cartoons first appeared in the New York Mail, New York World and New York Post. A strong advocate of civil liberties, Rollin Kirby often attacked instances of political corruption and institutions.

The artist biographies, research and or information pertaining to all the original works of art posted on our pages has been written and designed by Greg & Connie Peters exclusively for our site, (www.artoftheprint.com). Please visit us regularly to view the latest artworks offered for sale. We will soon be posting an update of our most recent research and include the biographical and historical information pertaining to our next collection of original works of art created by artists throughout the centuries. We hope you found the information you were looking for and that it has been beneficial.

www.artoftheprint.com guarantees the authenticity of every work of art we sell 100%. Full documentation and certification is provided. Our Gallery, Art of the Print, offers a wide selection of international fine art dating from the early Renaissance to the contemporary art period.

Original Conte Drawing Art by the American artist, Albert Edward Sterner.

View other original works of Art by Albert Sterner.

Albert Edward Sterner 'Albert Sterner' (London, England, 1863 - New York, 1946)
# Image Title & Artist Medium Date Info -
01- Meditation by Albert Sterner Original Drypoint Engraving 1933 Signed, dated, titled and annotated by Albert Edward Sterner, Trial Proof, First impression from the Plate. Available
02.- Portrait of Rollin Kirby by Albert Sterner Original Conte Drawing 1931 Signed and annotated, "Albert Sterner, of and for his friend" in Pencil by Albert Edward Sterner. Sold
03.- The Fight by Albert Sterner Original Drypoint Engraving and Soft Ground Etching 1931 Signed and dated in pencil by Albert Edward Sterner, Fifty impressions. Sold
04.- The Man Drawing by Albert Sterner Original Drypoint Engraving 1933 Signed and dated in pencil by Albert Edward Sterner, Twenty-five impressions. Sold
05.- The Promised Land by Albert Sterner Original Drypoint Engraving 1930 Signed and dated in pencil by Albert Edward Sterner, Twenty-five impressions Available
06.- The Woman Taken into Adultry by Albert Sterner Original Drypoint Engraving 1936 Signed, titled, and dated in pencil by Albert Edward Sterner, Twenty-five impressions Sold

View Our Selection of Original American Art of the Depression Era (c. 1930 - c. 1945)

American Art of the Depression Era dating from 1930 to 1945 (Art of The Print / www.artoftheprint.com - Artist Index: A to E): The following four pages contain a listing of original American etchings, lithographs woodcuts, serigraphs, watercolors, drawings, linocuts and wood engravings from the Depression decade of the 1930&rsquos and into the early 1940&rsquos. Despite the dire economic times publishers of original prints continued to survive and successfully raise revenue for the artists as well as making original art affordable during the Great Depression years.

Listed on the first page of the 'American Art of the Depression Era' directory are over fifty original works of art created by American artists such as, George Elbert Burr, his etchings, Little Canyon, Arizona and Morraine Park were both commissioned by The Print Connoisseur, while his Evening, Arizona was published by The Brooklyn Society of Etchers. Also, works such as, Kenneth Ballantyne's original linocut, Wood Nymphs appeared in The Colophon in New York in 1931. George Elmer Browne&rsquos The Fishing Fleet and Adolf Dehn&rsquos Threshing Near Kilkenny published by the Associated American Artists (A.A.A.), are other outstanding examples of early prints from this decade.

American Art of the Depression Era dating from 1930 to 1945 (Art of The Print / www.artoftheprint.com - Artist Index: F to J): The second page of this directory also contains a list of over fifty original works of art created during the Great Depression years by American artists. One of the more interesting aspects of art of the Depression is how seldom the actual misery and privation of the decade is depicted. On this page, for example, only Hugo Gellert&rsquos original lithograph, Primary Accumulation, protests the contemporary state of affairs. The visual arts (including films) set out to divert and entertain. Perhaps for artists an almost sure recipe for failure would have been to remind the average man of his sorry condition.

On the contrary most areas of the entertainment industries thrived. The art of Kenneth Hartwell is an excellent example. His lithographs of circus acrobats, jugglers and clowns and of the music, dancing and comedy of the Burlesque shows are worlds into themselves. Gazing at his imagery the viewer is granted a temporary reprieve from the real world.

American Art of the Depression Era dating from 1930 to 1945 (Art of The Print / www.artoftheprint.com - Artist Index: K to P): Even in a Depression the sense of a continuation of normal activities persists. In Joseph Margulies, New England Granny the subject does exactly what grannies do best as she contentedly sits in her rocker, sewing. Philip Parsons depicts a joyful family reunion in Home for Christmas and Henry Pitz depicts the dignity of work in his monumental art deco style in both Maine Fisherman and Man Against the Sky.

Purely by alphabetical accident, page 3 also contains two of my favorite night scenes: Alan Lewis&rsquo delightful color woodcut, Swinging the Gate and Martin Lewis&rsquo renowned Night in New York. This famous etching was published by the Chicago Society of Etchers in 1932.

American Art of the Depression Era dating from 1930 to 1945 (Art of The Print / www.artoftheprint.com - Artist Index: R to Z): Like the previous three pages, page four of this directory provides a full variety of Depression era themes and techniques. Stark realities of the times are provided by W. P. Robinson (Abandoned Farm) and Isadore Weiner (Gardening). In contrast are pieces like John W. Winkler&rsquos playful landscape, Rae Lakes, California and the fine animal studies by Clarence Zuelch.

Two magnificent drypoints by Albert Sterner -- Meditation and The Promised Land &ndash will also be found listed on that page. In particular, The Promised Land seems like a potent symbol of man&rsquos journey through the decade of the Great Depression. In total, there are over two hundred works of original art created by American artists from the Depression decade of the 1930&rsquos and into the early 1940&rsquos listed in the 'American Art of the Depression' directory.

Customer inquiries: Contact us or phone Greg & Connie (905) 957-6666


For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

  • Rights Advisory: Publication may be restricted. For information see "Rollin Kirby Rights and Restrictions Information," https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/585_kirb.html
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-139131 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: Unprocessed in PR 13 CN 2001:055-4 [item] [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


A Costly Failure to Consult 1919-1920

President Woodrow Wilson sailed to Europe to negotiate the Treaty of Versailles, setting peace terms concluding World War I and establishing the League of Nations. He failed to make peace with opponents back home. The Senate, exercising its constitutional duty to provide “advice and consent,” twice rejected the treaty.

The Democratic president had not consulted key lawmakers in the Republican-controlled Senate—particularly Henry Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts, the powerful Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. Senator Lodge offered 14 amendments to Wilson’s treaty. The president refused to compromise. Instead, Wilson embarked on a national speaking tour to win public support. While traveling, however, he suffered a physical collapse, which led to a paralyzing stroke. Without Wilson’s leadership, the treaty went down to defeat in the Senate, and America never joined the League of Nations.


Rollin Kirby Post

Rollin Kirby Post of Corte Madera, California, died at home on October 3, 2011 from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 81. Mr. Post was the most respected political reporter and commentator on television in California from the late 1960s-90s.

Mr. Post was born on May 27, 1930 in New York, New York. His father, Langdon Ward Post, was a New York State Assemblyman and member of Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Turkey” Cabinet before holding various New York City and federal government positions, primarily in housing. His mother, Janet Kirby Post, was a fashion model and civic volunteer. Mr. Post was named for his maternal grandfather, Rollin Kirby, a three-time winner – and the first recipient – of the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning.

Mr. Post attended Riverdale Country School where he was recognized for his baseball sportsmanship. He lived briefly in Tucson before moving with his mother to Southern California. There he attended The Webb School in Claremont, where he was captain of his high school baseball team. After a year at San Francisco State University and a year in the U.S. Army, Mr. Post attended the University of California at Berkeley, graduating in 1952 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. While at Cal he lived in Bowles Hall. After college, Mr. Post turned down a copyboy job at the San Francisco Chronicle and returned to Southern California with the goal of working in television, a medium still in its infancy. Inspired by Edward R. Murrow, he started as an usher at CBS Radio, then worked as morning copyboy for the news bureau. While at CBS Mr. Post met his wife of 57 years, Diane Opley Post. After a ten-week courtship they became engaged the couple married on September 18, 1954. The Posts lived in Pacific Palisades for several years and had two daughters. In 1957 Mr. Post moved to CBS affiliate KTTV, where he was head writer and producer for The Paul Coates Report, a nationally-syndicated newsmaker interview show and the first of its kind on television.

The Posts moved to San Francisco in 1961 and several months later bought a house in Greenbrae (Marin County), California, in which they lived for 47 years. Their son was born nearby. Mr. Post began work as morning producer and assignment editor for KPIX-TV Channel 5 News in San Francisco, and within a year became a news reporter. His career in broadcast journalism would span 40 years.

Soon after Mr. Post’s first appearance on the air, he won two awards from The Press Club of San Francisco. Active in Democratic party politics, Mr. Post stopped his personal involvement when he began reporting on politics, beginning with the 1964 Democratic and Republican conventions. They were the first of nine presidential election cycles on which he reported he attended 18 national conventions over 33 years. Also at KPIX, Mr. Post began a long tradition of live election night coverage of local and national elections. From his earliest assignments, he cultivated sources in both the Democratic and Republican parties and earned a reputation for fairness. He was and remained the only local television reporter covering politics exclusively, and interviewed the leading political figures of the day.

In 1973 after 12 years at KPIX, Mr. Post joined the evening round-table commentators on KQED-TV Channel 9’s Newsroom program. Newsroom evolved into A Closer Look, which Mr. Post co-hosted with his long-time colleague beginning at KPIX, Belva Davis. For A Closer Look in 1978, Mr. Post undertook an uncommon assignment when he traveled to Cuba to file a three-piece story on life �hind the scenes” in Castro’s post-revolutionary country. In addition to nightly reporting and analysis on KQED, Mr. Post hosted California Tonight with Ms. Davis, a weekly public affairs program that aired statewide.

Mr. Post moved to KRON-TV Channel 4 in 1979, where he remained as political editor until his retirement in 1997. While at KRON he continued daily political news reporting, evening commentary, and local and national election coverage. For 16 years with Ms. Davis, he hosted Sunday morning public affairs programs Weekend Extra and California This Week, then Our World This Week, an international news show. Early at KRON Mr. Post achieved national recognition when he interviewed Senator Edward Kennedy during his primary campaign for president. Mr. Kennedy’s surprising comments on the Shah of Iran during the Iran hostage crisis made international headlines and probably cost the senator his party’s nomination. In 1986 Mr. Post traveled to Manila to report on the Philippine presidential election, feeling the story warranted local coverage given the Bay Area’s large Filipino population.

Throughout his career Mr. Post supported his union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), and joined picket lines twice. In 1974, a year after starting at KQED, Mr. Post was among the reporters who led engineers, camera operators, and others in an 18-week strike, the first and only major strike against a PBS station. Then in 1980, less than a year after joining KRON, Mr. Post was on the picket line again when AFTRA and electrical and office workers’ unions struck the news station. He served as chairman of the strike committee.

In later years Mr. Post earned a number of professional awards. In 1983 he received the prestigious Broadcast Preceptor Award for “Outstanding Contributions to the Industry” from the 32nd Annual San Francisco State University Broadcast Industry Conference. A year later the CORO Foundation honored him with an Investment in Leadership Award. The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences inducted Mr. Post into the Silver Circle Class of 1990. In 1991 he received the Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Mr. Post was active in his community and served on several volunteer boards, including Common Cause, the World Affairs Council, U.C. Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies, and Marin County Historical Society. Upon his retirement, he helped fundraise for the San Francisco Bay Area Television Archive and was one of the first volunteers to tutor youngsters through Marin County School Volunteers.

Mr. Post was an ardent baseball fan. He divided his loyalties between the San Francisco Giants and Oakland Athletics, attending numerous games each season from the early 1960s until shortly before his death. Mr. Post was a tennis player in his younger years and member of the Rafael Racquet Club. A committed environmentalist throughout his life, he enjoyed taking his family on camping trips in the West. He remained an avid hiker and walker into his final years.

Mr. Post enjoyed movies and in 1972 appeared as himself in The Candidate with Robert Redford. He listened to an eclectic range of popular music and counted among his favorite performers Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee, and Johnny Cash. Mr. Post and his wife regularly attended performances of the Marin and San Francisco Symphonies, San Francisco Opera, and San Francisco Ballet. Supporters of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the couple donated an ancestral portrait by Winslow Homer to the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park.

As volunteers with the International Hospitality Center (now the National Council for International Visitors), Mr. and Mrs. Post housed and entertained foreign visitors to San Francisco. Later the Posts themselves were frequent travelers, going to a variety of U.S. cities and abroad. Among his many trips overseas, Mr. Post found those to Kenya, Russia, and China particularly memorable.

Mr. Post’s passion was politics, yet the city of San Francisco held his heart. Courted early in his career by network television in New York, he chose to remain in the Bay Area. Mr. Post had a wide circle of friends throughout California. He was a devoted husband, father, and grandfather.

Among Mr. Post’s finest qualities were his intellectual curiosity, sense of humor, integrity, lack of pretense, and unflagging enthusiasm. He is survived by his wife, Diane Post, two sisters, Wendy Moreton and Linda Post, three children, Lauren, Cynthia, and Kenneth Post, and five grandchildren.

Mr. Post was a long-time proponent of community and national efforts to improve society. His family requests that those wishing to remember him make a contribution to one of the following organizations of particular meaning to him: American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Common Cause, KQED, Marin County School Volunteers, San Francisco Bay Area Television Archive, Save the Bay, or World Affairs Council. Contributions to the Alzheimer’s Association also would be fitting.


Select works [ edit ]

"Tammany!" portrays the Republican party as hypocritical in decrying the Tammany Hall political machine.

"Exploding in his Hands" comments on the Zimmermann Telegram

Cartoon showing Senators Lodge, Borah and Hiram Johnson blocking Peace

Cartoon showing Humanity accusing the US Senate who has just murdered the Peace Treaty]]

"News From the Outside World" comments on the United States' failure to join the League of Nations.

"On the Road to Moscow" depicts Death leading victims of the Russian famine of 1921

Propaganda cartoon used during World War II.


Announcing The Rollin Kirby Project

Joseph S. Colello contacted the Notebook recently about an effort to get cartoonist Rollin Kirby, the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize (and who went on to win two more times), on a U.S. Postal Stamp.

“As an octognenarian, I have had a 35-year interest in Pulitzer winner Rolllin Kirby, and hope to live long enough to see him pictured on a U.S. stamp. Kirby’s familly has given me their blessing, [and I’m now] seeking ways to enlist (non-financial) support for my project.”

Colello has started a blog at http://archivedpaper.blogspot.com, that is devoted primarily to attaining a commemorative stamp for Kirby.

In an email, Colello wrote, “Some have received acknowlegement of their petitions. Our focus will be that RK was the FIRST editorial cartoonist to win the Pulitzer.

“Also worth noting: The year 2013 marks the 100th Anniversary of Kirby’s career at the NY World…. and one whose cartoons and essays in magazines influenced politicians to seriously consider women’s right to vote.

“I personally like to think of Rollin Kirby as the 20th century Thomas Nast… I noted in your Portland Convention plans you will be encouraging more public attendance. With luck & my physician’s OK, I will be among the visitors.” Colello lives in Woodinville, Wa.



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